Amanda Nguyen – The First Vietnamese Girl Nominated For The Nobel Peace Prize.

The only Vietnamese American to create and advocate for complete federal legislation, the 21st in modern US history, with 437 Representatives, 100 Senators, and the US President voting unanimously to approve the Sexual Assault Survivor's Rights Act.

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Amanda Nguyen is a social entrepreneur, civil rights activist, and the CEO and founder of Rise, a non-governmental civil rights organization.

She was the only Vietnamese American to create and advocate for complete federal legislation, the 21st in modern US history, with 437 Representatives, 100 Senators, and the US President voting unanimously to approve the Sexual Assault Survivor’s Rights Act. She has successfully lobbied for the legislation in 32 states so far. This collection of legislation benefits almost 85 million people.

Amanda Nguyen - Photo credit Kate Warren
Amanda Nguyen – Photo credit Kate Warren

Awards and honors

2016 – Young Women’s Honors Award, Marie Claire
2016 – Top 100 Global Thinkers, Foreign Policy
2017 – 2017 Women’s March Honored Guest and Speaker
2017 – Forbes 30 Under 30, Forbes
2017 – 40 Women to Watch, The Tempest
2018 – The Frederick Douglass 200 List
2019 – Nelson Mandela Changemaker Award
2019 – 24th Annual Heinz Awards in Public Policy
2019 – Vanity Fair Global Goals, Vanity Fair
2019 – Time 100 Next, Time
Nominations
2018 – Named a 2019 Nobel Peace Prize nominee for her activism by California representatives Mimi Walters and Zoe Lofgren.

Back To Her Day Of School

In primary school, she had an innate ability for public interaction. Since first grade, she has spoken confidently in front of a crowd and held several leadership roles at her school. She devotes a great deal of time to volunteer activities. According to her, she volunteered to acquire more life experience, assist others, and develop a better understanding of what people need, to subsequently increase her level of assistance in a variety of settings, including housekeeping, a hospital, a political office, and a school environment.

She previously donated funds for Dr. Bich Lien’s Vietnamese American Cancer Society. Following that, she made good use of her social experiences as a student.

Amada Nguyen and friends in FBLA in high school (Facebook character)
Amanda Nguyen and friends in FBLA in high school (Facebook character)

Amanda took numerous roles in the Future Trade Leadership group during her freshman year of high school. She was chosen 2008-2009 president of the All-California Future of Trade Leadership (FBLA). FBLA is the world’s biggest and most important association of exceptional business students. At the age of 16, Amanda was chosen FBLA president of the biggest state in America, showing her leadership, education, and maturity.

Amanda graduated from Centennial High School in Corona, California in 2009. Harvard, Stanford, UCLA, Berkeley, and UPenn… all admitted her. Finally, she picked Harvard – with a double major in politics and astrophysics. This is the school of her dreams. There was a little chalkboard in her room. She scribbled a note on the board that she needed to get into Harvard. Each morning when she awoke, she glanced at the board as a reminder. Amanda thrived and was versatile throughout his time at Harvard, excelling in studying, producing, and building much outstanding research. She established her name in Harvard history when she established a class of slavery today, a first in the university’s history. Her essay was chosen for publication in the 50th edition of the Harvard admission test. At the age of 19, she decided to go to Bangladesh, a nation so poor that it lacks even a toilet. Amanda must go to the fields to assist women who lack a voice. There, she risked her life by defying local tradition and language in order to prosecute a guy who murdered a Bangladeshi girl after raping a victim.

Amanda Nguyen at Wema Children's Center (Facebook character)
Amanda Nguyen at Wema Children’s Center (Facebook character)

Identify Legal Gaps

Amanda Nguyen was raped in 2013. She had a psychiatric breakdown but was unconcerned about remaining quiet; she preferred to battle alone rather than share her tale with family and friends.

She started gathering evidence, collecting DNA samples, and reporting to the Massachusetts authorities. After reporting it, she learned that the authorities may delete such evidence after six months if the victim did not request an extension, even though the statute of limitations for prosecuting a sex offender is 15 years. Amanda felt deceived at that moment. Her breakdown was precipitated by the agony of sexual assault and the judicial system’s apathy.

Rise

Nguyen established Rise, a nonprofit organization dedicated to defending the civil rights of sexual assault and rape survivors, in November 2014. Nguyen served as the organization’s executive director during her free time until September 2016. Rise is entirely volunteer-run, and the group has collected funds via GoFundMe. According to Nguyen, the organization was called Rise to “remind us that a small group of intelligent, dedicated people can rise and change the world.” Nguyen’s goal is for Rise to enact a Sexual Assault Survivor Bill of Rights in each of the 50 United States, as well as on a national level. Additionally, she went to Japan, where a similar law was introduced.

I have to live

Amanda Nguyen attained extraordinary success as a result of a variety of circumstances. Extensive vision, love for work, zeal for promoting justice, constant self-improvement in pursuit of her goal, but most significantly, her tremendous determination to overcome barriers and restrictions. Typical citizens. Additionally, it is difficult to overlook her parents’ unwavering support, which laid the natural basis and will for her social engagement.

Amanda Nguyen has matured much more than her classmates as a result of the effort and friction of early life via volunteering and extracurricular activities. She squandered not a single moment. When she was sixteen years old, she was diagnosed with a cardiac condition (Superventricular Tachycardia) and was feared to have died. She was confined to a wheelchair for many months. However, not to the point where she abandons her course. Prior to doing her heart surgery under anesthesia, the doctor inquired as to what she wanted to say. “I have to live – I have to live,” she said resolutely and optimistically!

Amanda Nguyen