20 Foods With More Protein Than Eggs – Part 1

20 Foods With More Protein Than Eggs – Part 1

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, the United States produced an astounding 279 table eggs per person in 2018, a record high (USDA). Assume, though, that you are not an egg person—or that you are vegan, or that you are an egg eater who is just trying to increase the variety of proteins in your diet. As it turns out, there are several higher-quality sources of this essential macronutrient available, including traditional animal proteins such as meat, dairy, and seafood, as well as a wide variety of plant proteins such as beans and legumes. Here is a list of 20 foods that have more protein than eggs.

In the average American’s diet, eggs are synonymous with protein. With six grams of protein per large egg and seven grams per extra large egg, it’s easy to see why we rely so heavily on the affordable, versatile chicken egg. According to the USDA, the US produced 279 table eggs per person in 2018. (USDA).

But what if you don’t like eggs, or you’re a vegan, or you’re an egg eater looking to diversify your protein intake? There are plenty of richer sources of this essential macronutrient, including meat, dairy, and seafood, as well as plant proteins like beans and legumes. These 20 foods have more protein than eggs.

Click here for Part 2: https://illume-emag.com/20-foods-with-more-protein-than-eggs-part-2.html

photo: xiangyan meng / Getty Images
photo: xiangyan meng / Getty Images

1. Adzuki beans (9 grams of protein per ½ cup serving (cooked))

Adzuki beans - photo: Michelle Arnold / EyeEm / Getty Images
Adzuki beans – photo: Michelle Arnold / EyeEm / Getty Images

Adzuki beans aren’t as popular as garbanzo, kidney, or cannellini beans, but they have a slight protein edge. Of course, they have eight grams of fiber per serving.

2. Salmon (19 grams of protein per 3 oz. serving)

Salmon - photo: Malorny / Getty Images
Salmon – photo: Malorny / Getty Images

Salmon. Salmon is a favorite fish for many reasons, including its beautiful pink color, delicious texture, and ease of preparation. Salmon is also a great source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids.

3. Kefir (10 grams of protein per 1 cup serving )

kefir - photo: Gorchittza2012 / Getty Images
kefir – photo: Gorchittza2012 / Getty Images

This thick, creamy drink is loaded with protein and probiotics. Kefir, a cross between milk and yogurt, is great in smoothies and can be used in a surprising number of dishes, from chicken to pancakes. Or buy a fruit-flavored variety to drink alone.

4. Pumpkin seeds (10 grams of protein per ¼ cup serving)

Pumpkin seeds are high in fat (14 grams per serving), but they are also a protein powerhouse. They are delicious raw or roasted. Snack on a handful, add to trail mix, or sprinkle on soup or salad for a healthy crunch.

5. Edamame (9 grams of protein per ½ cup serving)

Soy in its natural state is bright green, crunchy, and delicious. Buy freeze-dried edamame for a work snack, or add pre-shelled frozen edamame to a stir-fry or pasta salad.

pumpkin seeds - photo: Blanchi Costela / Getty Images
pumpkin seeds – photo: Blanchi Costela / Getty Images

6. Quark (13 grams of protein per ½ cup serving)

quark - photo: pamela_d_mcadams / Getty Images
quark – photo: pamela_d_mcadams / Getty Images

Aside from the cool name, quark is awesome for many reasons. This fresh cheese is a German version of Greek yogurt. It’s great on its own, in a smoothie, or in place of sour cream or cream cheese.

7. Tuna (31 grams of protein per 6.5 oz. can)

canned tuna - photo: NLAURIA / Getty Images
canned tuna – photo: NLAURIA / Getty Images

Tuna in cans is vastly underrated. It’s also cheap, shelf-stable, and high in omega-3 fatty acids. A tuna-salad sandwich is always a winner. If you prefer fancy tuna, tuna steaks and sashimi are great options.

8. Tempeh (16 grams of protein per 3 oz. serving)

tempeh - photo: Harald Walker / EyeEm / Getty Images
tempeh – photo: Harald Walker / EyeEm / Getty Images

Tempeh, like tofu, is versatile and absorbent of flavors. Tempeh is higher in protein, firmer, and has a nuttier flavor. It’s traditionally made from fermented soybeans with rice, millet, or flax seed added.

9. Peanut butter (8 grams of protein per 2 Tbsp. serving)

peanut butter - photo: Wanwisa Hernandez / EyeEm / Getty Images
peanut butter – photo: Wanwisa Hernandez / EyeEm / Getty Images

While peanut butter is known for its high fat content (16 g per serving), it is also high in protein (plus a bit of fiber, at 3 grams per serving). It’s a great way to add protein to a sweet snack like PB & J or an apple and PB.

10. Chicken (24 grams of protein per 3 oz. serving (breast, cooked))

grilled chicken breasts - photo: EasyBuy4u / Getty Images
grilled chicken breasts – photo: EasyBuy4u / Getty Images

In terms of protein content, chickens definitely beat their own eggs. Quick, easy, and versatile, this weeknight dinner staple has it all. If you want more fat with your protein, eat it with the skin on or on your thighs.

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