Tomato, Corn, And Burrata Salad With Arugula

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A tomato, mozzarella, and basil salad screams summer, and my family adores it.

However, let us take it a step further: Combine some freshly cooked corn, arugula, and a hunk of burrata in a small bowl. And the vivacious tang of a simple oil and vinegar dressing brings everything together. You’ve landed on the moon!

Tomato, corn, and burrata salad with arugula - Photo by Sally Vargas
Tomato, corn, and burrata salad with arugula – Photo by Sally Vargas

What Exactly Is Burrata?

Burrata is a fresh Italian buffalo milk cheese that is similar to mozzarella but contains a rich, thick cream filling (you can stop swooning now).

Originally created to utilize leftover mozzarella curds, the curds are stretched into a smooth ball with a hollow center that is then filled with cream and uncooked mozzarella curds. As the cheese ages, the soft center ferments slightly, imparting a slight tanginess to the cheese.

You can eat burrata at any time of year, but it pairs perfectly with a summer salad.

Tomato, corn, and burrata salad with arugula - Photo by Sally Vargas
Tomato, corn, and burrata salad with arugula – Photo by Sally Vargas

What Can I Substitute for Burrata?

If you are unable to locate burrata in your supermarket, seek it out at an Italian or specialty deli. Additionally, if you are unable to locate all of the ingredients, you may substitute regular mozzarella. Just be aware that it will not be as creamy as burrata, but you will still enjoy it.

Which Tomatoes Should I Use?

This salad is entirely composed of tomatoes in their prime. While a variety of colors, shapes, and sizes look nice, you should use any tomatoes that appear juicy and delectable.

The key is simplicity—no fancy footwork here—just truly fresh ingredients brought to the table alongside thick slices of the best bread you can find to soak up the dressing.

Ingredients:

For the dressing:

  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 6 tablespoons olive oil
  • Pinch of black pepper

For the salad

  • 4 ears corn
  • 2 large handfuls baby arugula
  • 1 pint mixed cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 2 large tomatoes, sliced
  • 1 (8-ounce) ball burrata
  • About 8 large basil leaves, torn into pieces
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Crusty bread, for serving

Instructions

1. Prepare the dressing as follows:

Whisk together the vinegar, salt, and pepper in a small bowl. Whisk in the olive oil gradually.

Tomato, corn, and burrata salad with arugula - Photo by Sally Vargas
Tomato, corn, and burrata salad with arugula – Photo by Sally Vargas

2. Prepare the corn:

A large pot of salted water should be brought to a boil. Cook for 2 minutes before adding the corn. Drain and rinse under cold running water.

To remove the kernels from the cob, place one in the center of a bundt pan (or a mixing bowl with an overturned ramekin in the middle). Cut the kernels from the cob in a downward motion with a knife, allowing the kernels to collect in the bundt pan’s well.

Rep with the remaining cobs. This post contains additional information about this technique.

Tomato, corn, and burrata salad with arugula - Photo by Sally Vargas
Tomato, corn, and burrata salad with arugula – Photo by Sally Vargas

3. Toss the corn and arugula in a large bowl:

Toss the arugula and corn in a medium bowl with 2 tablespoons of the dressing. (Reserve any remaining dressing for drizzling over the salad before serving.)

Tomato, corn, and burrata salad with arugula - Photo by Sally Vargas
Tomato, corn, and burrata salad with arugula – Photo by Sally Vargas

4. Assemble the salad:

Distribute the arugula and corn evenly among four salad plates. Transfer the burrata to the salad plates after gently cutting it into four quarters.

Salads should be topped with sliced tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, and basil leaves that have been torn. Serve with additional dressing and a few grinds of black pepper alongside crusty bread.

Tomato, corn, and burrata salad with arugula - Photo by Sally Vargas
Tomato, corn, and burrata salad with arugula – Photo by Sally Vargas